‘Global’ Category

  1. (The) Burgess-Kubrick Squib

    3

    March 11, 2017 by AK

    In Prospect Magazine, Kevin Jackson writes that Stanley Kubrick’s “slick and meretricious film” was an “ambiguous triumph” for Anthony Burgess… …since he regarded the book, most of which he had dashed off in three weeks, as a squib. It’s not clear to me whether Jackson put “squib” to mean a witty tour de force – …
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  2. The US entry freeze: far from a blanket Muslim ban

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    The country with the largest Muslim population in the world is Indonesia, followed by Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. These four account for more than 40% of the total. Nigeria is in the fifth place. Egypt, Iran and Turkey share places six through eight. The Muslims in the seven countries covered by the American temporary ban …
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  3. Iran as the odd man out

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    I can understand Washington’s resolve to keep out people from disorderly (ex-)polities such as Libya, Somalia, Yemen and Sudan, as well as from the ISIS-infected Syria and Iraq, but Iran is an entirely different matter. To begin with, it’s a real country – bluntly speaking – while the others on the list are patchwork states …
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  4. “A quasi-religious faith in a pan-European identity”

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    January 23, 2017 by AK

    At last, a piece on the “alt-right” that doesn’t mention Dugin! Plus, it hinges on this worthwhile observation: The alt-right’s love of Europeanism blends racial politics with a quasi-religious faith in a pan-European identity. Says Devin Burghart, vice president of the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights: “It is white nationalist internationalism,” he added. The aim “is …
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  5. Trust the absurd

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    January 23, 2017 by AK

    An intelligence professional able to reliably report the content of highly confidential conversations between the president of a major power and his trusted lieutenant (both former intelligence professionals) would be a unique asset of inordinate value and would be extremely unlikely to put his sources at risk by sending his reports to private individuals in another …
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  6. If Tchaikovsky had given up on E. O.

    2

    January 17, 2017 by AK

    Reviewing T. J. Binyon‘s biography of Pushkin, James Wood remarked in 2003: It is in some ways unfortunate that Tchaikovsky set Eugene Onegin to music, not Rossini, the composer of deep shallows. Pushkin, according to T.J. Binyon’s remarkable biography, became ‘addicted’ to Rossini while living in Odessa, where an Italian opera company was visiting… Yes, …
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  7. Error fixed: comments no longer closed “on articles older than 28 days”

    0

    January 15, 2017 by AK

    Seeing that comments were off for some older posts, I couldn’t figure out what went wrong until I noticed that comments to posts older than 28 days were automatically disabled via Settings > Discussion > Other comment settings. I have not idea when and how that box got checked – by default, perhaps, during a …
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  8. The two Moores

    10

    January 9, 2017 by AK

    Until this year, I did not realize how many Russian translations of Thomas Moore’s poetry had been produced in the 19th century, especially its first half. For details, I recommend two investigations into the subject (in Russian): Mikhail Alexeyev’s 1982 article in Literary Heritage (Volume 91, Chapter VIII [warning: a large pdf], pp. 657-824), which …
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  9. “What a divine thing!”

    1

    December 26, 2016 by AK

    My fondest musical memory of the year 2016 will probably be the April, 16, performance of Schumann’s oratorio Das Paradies und die Peri by the Russian National Orchestra and the Popov Academy choir directed by Mikhail Pletnev. I expected something unusual to extraordinary. The result was close to the latter thanks to Pletnev’s inordinate understanding …
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  10. Vlad: the Omnipotent Cat

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    December 17, 2016 by AK

    Ivan Krylov published The Mouse and the Rat in 1816. My rough translation follows, without the last quatrain, or the “moral” of the fable. “Dear neighbor, have your heard the good rumors?” Said Mouse to Rat, running in. “They say the cat has fallen into the lion’s claws? It’s time for us to have some rest.” “Don’t rejoice, …
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