‘Global’ Category

  1. Bad journalism at its best

    0

    May 27, 2017 by AK

    Anne Applebaum wrote in her Washington Post column, right up in its title: There is no one right way to react to terror. There is a wrong way. I’m not sure who died and bequeathed the arbiter morum job to Anne Applebaum, but there you are: Even before the biography of the killer was known or his …
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  2. The sentence that made my weekend

    2

    May 24, 2017 by AK

    Via Crooked Timber, this corpuscle of pure delight at Bleeding Heart Libertarians: This journal doesn’t even hit the top 115 journals in Gender Studies. Here’s the list of the 115 top Gender Studies journals in the world referred to above. Granted, some of the publications on the list have a different primary focus. Taking them out still leaves a …
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  3. Belated realizations

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    May 18, 2017 by AK

    An interesting discussion at Crooked Timber of the mutual loathing between the self-serving experts and the havoc-wreaking masses. Some quotes from the opening post and the comment thread: But that unwillingness to believe the experts, even when they’re right, isn’t based on nothing, but rather in the repeated overpromising of those who know best together with …
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  4. “Sometimes pace _is_ argument”

    5

    April 16, 2017 by AK

    Ada Palmer, who teaches history at Chicago, writes science fiction and composes music, reminisces on her early encounter with Thomas Carlyle’s prose: My cohort and I were wolfing down a book a day in those months, looting each for thesis and argument, so we could regurgitate debates, and discuss how our own projects fit with the larger questions …
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  5. (The) Burgess-Kubrick Squib

    3

    March 11, 2017 by AK

    In Prospect Magazine, Kevin Jackson writes that Stanley Kubrick’s “slick and meretricious film” was an “ambiguous triumph” for Anthony Burgess… …since he regarded the book, most of which he had dashed off in three weeks, as a squib. It’s not clear to me whether Jackson put “squib” to mean a witty tour de force – …
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  6. The US entry freeze: far from a blanket Muslim ban

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    The country with the largest Muslim population in the world is Indonesia, followed by Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. These four account for more than 40% of the total. Nigeria is in the fifth place. Egypt, Iran and Turkey share places six through eight. The Muslims in the seven countries covered by the American temporary ban …
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  7. Iran as the odd man out

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    I can understand Washington’s resolve to keep out people from disorderly (ex-)polities such as Libya, Somalia, Yemen and Sudan, as well as from the ISIS-infected Syria and Iraq, but Iran is an entirely different matter. To begin with, it’s a real country – bluntly speaking – while the others on the list are patchwork states …
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  8. “A quasi-religious faith in a pan-European identity”

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    January 23, 2017 by AK

    At last, a piece on the “alt-right” that doesn’t mention Dugin! Plus, it hinges on this worthwhile observation: The alt-right’s love of Europeanism blends racial politics with a quasi-religious faith in a pan-European identity. Says Devin Burghart, vice president of the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights: “It is white nationalist internationalism,” he added. The aim “is …
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  9. Trust the absurd

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    January 23, 2017 by AK

    An intelligence professional able to reliably report the content of highly confidential conversations between the president of a major power and his trusted lieutenant (both former intelligence professionals) would be a unique asset of inordinate value and would be extremely unlikely to put his sources at risk by sending his reports to private individuals in another …
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  10. If Tchaikovsky had given up on E. O.

    2

    January 17, 2017 by AK

    Reviewing T. J. Binyon‘s biography of Pushkin, James Wood remarked in 2003: It is in some ways unfortunate that Tchaikovsky set Eugene Onegin to music, not Rossini, the composer of deep shallows. Pushkin, according to T.J. Binyon’s remarkable biography, became ‘addicted’ to Rossini while living in Odessa, where an Italian opera company was visiting… Yes, …
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