‘UK’ Category

  1. The Royal Society reinvents statistics

    2

    January 21, 2018 by AK

    I read this post by Nassim Nicholas Taleb yesterday morning, checked out the links and still can’t quite believe my eyes. Last December, the Royal Statistical Society announced its first ever International Statistic of the Year, part of “a new initiative that celebrates how statistics can help us better understand the world around us.” The winning statistic …
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  2. False equivalence as fake news

    0

    January 6, 2018 by AK

    On a meager data plan in this Alpine cottage, I’ve limited myself to reading news stories – no images, no streaming video, no podcasts. That’s my preferred way of getting news anyway. Unsurprisingly, I’ve been aware of the Iranian protests, or uprising perhaps, since their early days. I read about President Trump’s support for the …
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  3. Jayda Fransen’s “hate crime(s)” as 1st Amendment-protected speech

    2

    December 1, 2017 by AK

    President Trump has retweeted three videos posted by Jayda Fransen, an English anti-Muslim activist. It has been reported that Fransen has been convicted of a “hate crime” and charged with two others in the UK. Closer inspection reveals that the laws she has purportedly broken are mildly Orwellian – with apologies to Ben Judah. The …
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  4. “I was more wicked than I had imagined”

    1

    November 29, 2017 by AK

    Last week, Ben Judah wrote in The American Interest: Why is it always Orwell o’clock? Why is everything mildly unpleasant about government instantly Orwellian? Why is every banal propaganda effort obviously 1984 sprung to life?.. Most of the Orwell cult only irritates, but one thing legitimately grates: the idea of Eric Blair as a monument …
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  5. This is not the Red Army

    2

    November 21, 2017 by AK

    In the London Review of Books, T.J. Clarke reviews Revolution: Russian Art 1917-32, an art show put on by the Royal Academy in London. His review is illustrated, among other images, with this photograph, captioned “The Red Army with the black square.” It gets at least one of the colors wrong. This cannot be the Red Army: the servicemen …
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  6. Leavers: 38% in Catalonia, 37% in UK (and 38% in Scotland)

    3

    October 2, 2017 by AK

    A little fewer than 38% of the eligible voters answered “yes” in the Catalonian independence referendum yesterday. That is, 42% turned out to vote and 89% of them voted “yes” to independence. Or, to count directly, 2.02 million out of the 5.34 registered voters chose independence. In last year’s Brexit referendum, over 37% of the …
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  7. The Purple Death

    0

    September 12, 2017 by AK

    From Eliot Weinberger’s Not Recommended Reading in the London Review of Books: The Purple Death (1895) by William Livingston Alden Professor Schmidt, a bacteriologist, believes that the way to bring about economic equality is not by assassinating the capitalists, who are easily replaced, but by eliminating millions of workers, thereby creating a labour shortage that would …
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  8. Bad journalism at its best

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    May 27, 2017 by AK

    Anne Applebaum wrote in her Washington Post column, right up in its title: There is no one right way to react to terror. There is a wrong way. I’m not sure who died and bequeathed the arbiter morum job to Anne Applebaum, but there you are: Even before the biography of the killer was known or his …
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  9. “Activist Left Gets Putin Critic’s Scalp”

    0

    April 22, 2017 by AK

    Three headlines, all about Bill O’Reilly’s getting fired from Fox News. All translations are mine. The BBC Russian Service: The Fox host who called Putin a killer has been fired because of a sex scandal. RT news in Russian: The journalist who insulted Putin has been fired from Fox News. Breitbart: the first version of the headline, removed …
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  10. “Sometimes pace _is_ argument”

    5

    April 16, 2017 by AK

    Ada Palmer, who teaches history at Chicago, writes science fiction and composes music, reminisces on her early encounter with Thomas Carlyle’s prose: My cohort and I were wolfing down a book a day in those months, looting each for thesis and argument, so we could regurgitate debates, and discuss how our own projects fit with the larger questions …
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