‘US’ Category

  1. An odd disclosure

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    June 23, 2017 by AK

    This is a bizarre piece overall but its ending is simply unbelievable: But Obama also signed the secret finding… authorizing a new covert program… The cyber operation is still in its early stages and involves deploying “implants” in Russian networks deemed “important to the adversary and that would cause them pain and discomfort if they …
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  2. Clarification on Caesarism

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    June 17, 2017 by AK

    Michael Anton wrote at least three posts in 2016 to discuss the applicability of Trump(ism)-Caesar(ism) parallels to the American situation. In doing so, Anton relied on Leo Strauss’ work, particularly his Restatement on Xenophon’s Hiero, a response to Eric Voegelin and Alexandre Kojève. That’s what I alluded to in my previous post.


  3. Next time, call him Nero

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    June 14, 2017 by AK

    Tim Newman quotes a tweet by Oliver Kamm occasioned by this NYT story: New York’s Public Theater lost financial support from two high-profile corporate donors, Delta Air Lines and Bank of America, on Sunday amid intense criticism of its production of Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar,” which depicts the assassination of a Trump-like Roman ruler. To which …
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  4. Flying stones

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    June 10, 2017 by AK

    This 1989 painting (the one on the left, Falling Stones I) by Nikolai Vechtomov (1923-2007) resembles an older work of his, from the 1960s, shown at the Thaw exhibition that ended in Moscow yesterday. Unfortunately, I cannot find the earlier work online, bust it’s probably oil on canvas and has “stone(s)” in the title. Both paintings make …
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  5. Goodthink for teens, from Harvard to the Kremlin

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    June 9, 2017 by AK

    In some ways, this is creepier than all the Putinist propaganda. The lady is advertising her services as a goodthink coach for teenagers. Her lengthy ad, posing as a New York Times piece, begins with a reminder: Earlier this week, Harvard University revealed that it had rescinded admissions offers to at least 10 students who …
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  6. To laughter and flaccidity

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    June 1, 2017 by AK

    Christian Lorentzen, a columnist for New York Magazine and a former (?) editor-at-large with the LRB, has published an amusing essay subtitled “A brief history of sex in American fiction.” Amusing, that is, when read for low-level textual entertainment, not for meaning. Let me quote without opening and closing ellipses and proper attributions, indiscriminately​: characters travel by various means… in …
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  7. Trump’s reasoning is OK. His assumptions are outdated

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    May 30, 2017 by AK

    To quote a post by myself from June 2016: Trump, it turns out, has consistently argued since at least 1990 that the terms of trade between the United States and its allies unfairly favor the latter because the US subsidizes them to a vast extent by providing for free a crucial public good: regional and global security. …
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  8. Where Go the Scrapboats?

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    May 29, 2017 by AK

    Early on in Theophilus North, the last novel by Thornton Wilder (1897-1975), the narrator sells his old car to a mechanic for $20. (The novel, published in 1973, is set in 1926, when $20 was roughly the average weekly wage of an unskilled worker.) The car has quite a history and a name, Hannah, taken …
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  9. Bad journalism at its best

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    May 27, 2017 by AK

    Anne Applebaum wrote in her Washington Post column, right up in its title: There is no one right way to react to terror. There is a wrong way. I’m not sure who died and bequeathed the arbiter morum job to Anne Applebaum, but there you are: Even before the biography of the killer was known or his …
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  10. “Nothing I saw at Magadan… suggested slave labor.”

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    May 15, 2017 by AK

    Henry Wallace was a man of great talent and achievement. As a politician, however, was susceptible to selective blindness or conscience-soothing self-delusion. In May 1944, he visited the camps of the Kolyma basin – the vast, permafrost-covered northeasternmost island of the Gulag Arkhipelago. The title of Robert Conquest’s 1978 book, Kolyma: The Arctic Death Camps, is …
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