‘US’ Category

  1. Executed for treason? Not in the US.

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    February 21, 2017 by AK

    Reviewing The Bughouse: The Poetry, Politics and Madness of Ezra Pound by Daniel Swift, Robert Crawford claims that “Pound was lucky not to be executed as a traitor.” In theory, the death penalty was applicable but in practice, how many people have been executed for treason in the US? Not espionage, sabotage or sedition but treason? …
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  2. Adam Shatz’s violent fantasies

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    February 18, 2017 by AK

    Adam Shatz, a contributing editor at The London Review of Books, writes on his blog: Many, perhaps most of us who live in coastal cities have found ourselves having criminal thoughts and violent fantasies since 9 November. Some involve Trump and Steve Bannon… still others involve the fabled white working class that is supposed to have …
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  3. Shared misconceptions, the great unifier

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    February 13, 2017 by AK

    Both the headline editors at The New York Times and Steve Bannon have made the dubious claim that Julius Evola influenced Italian fascism. I have tried to explain why the idea that Evola had a considerable impact on either Mussolini or his senior ideologues is probably wrong, even though the baron’s writings might have impressed …
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  4. Michael McFaul’s easy, broken parallel

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    February 5, 2017 by AK

    Michael McFaul, the former US ambassador to Russia, has a blog on the site of Ekho Moskvy, the independent radio station based in Moscow. Commenting on the appointment of Steve Bannon to the National Security Council, he wrote: It’s the equivalent of Putin appointing Alexander Dugin to the [Russian] Security Council and telling generals Bortnikov [head …
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  5. Viktor Orbán on the “greatest human value”

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    February 4, 2017 by AK

    “A is wrong, B is meaningless, C is unproven, E does not follow from D” is my typical reaction to a typical post on Crooked Timber, but I visit the blog every other day. I am rewarded with occasional pearls or a humbling experience, such as today’s. Discussing Ernest Gellner’s view of civil society, Henry Farrell wrote of …
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  6. Olga Khazan on the long wait in Santa Marinella

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    February 3, 2017 by AK

    Olga Khazan writes of her quest for asylum in The Atlantic: In 1989, my family and I were living in a small shared apartment in Santa Marinella, Italy, just northwest of Rome, waiting to find out if the United States would accept our application for asylum. Jewish families leaving the USSR typically took an Aeroflot flight …
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  7. The model refugees

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    February 2, 2017 by AK

    ​I’m not sure what point Julia Ioffe tried to make with her latest piece in The Atlantic, other than to recall the limbo of being a prospective immigrant and, later, one in transit. I have no doubt her family have been upstanding and productive citizens since arriving in the US in 1990. I am less sure they were refugees in the proper sense, …
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  8. The US entry freeze: far from a blanket Muslim ban

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    The country with the largest Muslim population in the world is Indonesia, followed by Pakistan, India, and Bangladesh. These four account for more than 40% of the total. Nigeria is in the fifth place. Egypt, Iran and Turkey share places six through eight. The Muslims in the seven countries covered by the American temporary ban …
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  9. The flip side

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    January 31, 2017 by AK

    “The witch has lost: now everything is permitted” seems to be the operative motto of the day in the Kremlin and its environs. Thus, the de-facto leader of the opposition – the only opposition politician with presidential potential – is to be further harassed and, possibly, imprisoned on transparently bogus charges. Russia’s long slide to misery has …
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  10. Blame it on J. Q.

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    January 29, 2017 by AK

    Josef Joffe is der Herausgeber – “publisher-editor” – of the influential Hamburg weekly Die Zeit. He grew up in West Berlin but went to college and earned his postgraduate degrees in the US. When writing in English, Joffe comes across as an American neoconservative with a better than average education and sense of humor. Appearing …
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