Posts Tagged ‘Italy’

  1. The conflict is shaping new identities

    8

    April 15, 2015 by AK

    The Guardian published a long article by Peter Pomerantsev on the Kremlin’s information warfare last week, along with a Russian translation. While it reads smoothly in English, the Russian version requires a little effort to take in, but I still hope it gets reprinted and discussed in Russia. (It has an odd word, блёф, in it, probably a …
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  2. Good news from Rome, at last

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    March 28, 2015 by AK

    I did not expect Italy’s supreme court (Cassazione) to acquit both Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito outright: I was, in fact, rather skeptical that Knox’s conviction would be reversed at all, and did not hope for a straight acquittal “for not having committed the crime,” which is exactly what happened about an hour ago. The …
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  3. At the mercy of a self-governing judicial mafia

    1

    March 25, 2015 by AK

    From Edward Luttwak’s interview with Il Giornale, February 2013. Available; on the paper’s website; a pdf of the original available here;.  Previously quoted in this post. All translation errors are mine. Title: “Italy? A country where liberty is limited by the omnipotence of the magistrates.” Subtitle: “A US analyst: ‘Public prosecutors are a self-governing caste …
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  4. “We fell asleep and I didn’t wake up until Friday morning”

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    March 25, 2015 by AK

    Nina Burleigh writes that Amanda Knox never retracted her bizarre sort-of-confession “officially”: After she was arrested, Knox wrote in a notebook that she wasn’t sure of the memory described in her signed statement, but she did not officially retract her claim that Lumumba had been in the house. Officially or not, Knox passed two handwritten …
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  5. When a judge is more dangerous than a mafioso

    1

    March 24, 2015 by AK

    Diego Gambetta, a professor of sociology at Oxford and the author of Codes of the Underworld: How Criminals Communicate, explains his findings: An unexpected result of my research on the mafia was to find out that mafiosi are quite incompetent at doing anything… Mafiosi are good at intimidation and stick to it…. They let the professionals and the entrepreneurs …
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  6. Judges and prosecutors “laughing and chatting,” “lunching together”

    2

    March 22, 2015 by AK

    A brief addendum to this post: in Italy as in Russia, prosecutors and judges often work as one team. I wrote this, among other things, about one of the most shameful criminal trials in recent Russian history (followed by a belated parole): While they were busy with the defendant, the judge would walk out into another …
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  7. What reasonable doubt? Russia learning from Italy

    1

    March 22, 2015 by AK

    Russia’s infamous Investigative Committee is pushing a bill to make judges in criminal cases search for “objective truth” rather than merely weigh arguments put forward by the prosecution and the defense. To that end, judges would be allowed – and encouraged – to call witnesses and otherwise conduct their own investigation during the trial. Russian …
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  8. A minor victory in Italy

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    January 30, 2015 by AK

    I’ve blogged about the l’Aquila earthquake trial but neglected to mention that all but one of the scientists convicted by the first-level court were acquitted by an appeals court in November 2014. David Wolman and Lorenzo Mannella reported: Today, after a surprisingly swift-by-Italian-standards appeals process, the three-judge panel acquitted six of the men. The seventh, Bernardo De Bernardinis, received …
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  9. A blog on L’Aquila

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    October 20, 2014 by AK

    Via David Wolman‘s Twitter feed, I have found Earthquakes and Great Risks, a blog on the Aquila earthquake trial maintained by a group of Italians. I have written about the earthquake trial here and here but I’m no authority on the case – I’ve learned most of what I know about it from Wolman’s article and notes. The Italian blog …
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  10. When science has no chance

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    September 14, 2014 by AK

    An enlightening piece on the 2012 conviction of Italian seismologists by David Wolman. The prosecutor offered, and the judge accepted, the theory that Italy’s leading seismologists had conspired with the mayor’s office in l’Aquila to send a falsely reassuring message to the town’s residents, who had been warned of an impending disaster by a lay forecaster called Gianpaolo Giuliani, …
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