Posts Tagged ‘Raffaele Sollecito’

  1. Good news from Rome, at last

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    March 28, 2015 by AK

    I did not expect Italy’s supreme court (Cassazione) to acquit both Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito outright: I was, in fact, rather skeptical that Knox’s conviction would be reversed at all, and did not hope for a straight acquittal “for not having committed the crime,” which is exactly what happened about an hour ago. The …
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  2. “Dangerous speculation that is another example of confirmation bias”

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    March 27, 2015 by AK

    Peter Gill coauthored the 1985 article in Nature that proposed using DNA “fingerprinting” in forensic science. Later on, Dr. Gill developed a “super-sensitive” method of DNA typing known as “low copy number” (LCN) or “low-template” profiling. John M. Butler, the author of the best-known textbook on forensic DNA typing, wrote in 2014: In my opinion. over the past …
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  3. At the mercy of a self-governing judicial mafia

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    March 25, 2015 by AK

    From Edward Luttwak’s interview with Il Giornale, February 2013. Available; on the paper’s website; a pdf of the original available here;.  Previously quoted in this post. All translation errors are mine. Title: “Italy? A country where liberty is limited by the omnipotence of the magistrates.” Subtitle: “A US analyst: ‘Public prosecutors are a self-governing caste …
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  4. “We fell asleep and I didn’t wake up until Friday morning”

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    March 25, 2015 by AK

    Nina Burleigh writes that Amanda Knox never retracted her bizarre sort-of-confession “officially”: After she was arrested, Knox wrote in a notebook that she wasn’t sure of the memory described in her signed statement, but she did not officially retract her claim that Lumumba had been in the house. Officially or not, Knox passed two handwritten …
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  5. When a judge is more dangerous than a mafioso

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    March 24, 2015 by AK

    Diego Gambetta, a professor of sociology at Oxford and the author of Codes of the Underworld: How Criminals Communicate, explains his findings: An unexpected result of my research on the mafia was to find out that mafiosi are quite incompetent at doing anything… Mafiosi are good at intimidation and stick to it…. They let the professionals and the entrepreneurs …
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  6. Judges and prosecutors “laughing and chatting,” “lunching together”

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    March 22, 2015 by AK

    A brief addendum to this post: in Italy as in Russia, prosecutors and judges often work as one team. I wrote this, among other things, about one of the most shameful criminal trials in recent Russian history (followed by a belated parole): While they were busy with the defendant, the judge would walk out into another …
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  7. The ben trovato school of jurisprudence

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    March 20, 2015 by AK

    Nina Burleigh, the author of The Fatal Gift of Beauty (which I have quoted before), writes in Newsweek ahead of the final ruling by Italy’s supreme court due next Wednesday in the Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito case (which she expects to be yet another Italian disaster): The appeals judge, Pratillo Hellmann [who acquitted the …
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  8. “The most powerful… tend to be the least intellectually distinguished”

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    March 12, 2015 by AK

    The Russian media are excited that the Moscow State University (MGU, Lomonossov U.) hit the top 25 of The Times Higher Education‘s “reputation ranking,” while the St. Petersburg Uni (SPbGU, Mendeleyev U.) made the top 80. Reputation is important, of course, but ratings based on harder metrics are less flattering. The THE‘s standard ranking puts …
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  9. Science be damned, Italian edition

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    March 7, 2015 by AK

    Reading Nina Burleigh’s book* on the malicious prosecution of Amanda Knox in Italy, The Fatal Gift of Beauty, I am struck over and over again by the offensive indifference to fairness and integrity displayed by Italy’s judicial apparatus. In particular, by the way the founding principles of scientific cognition, upon which the Western world has been …
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  10. Hostages of corrupt states

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    February 18, 2015 by AK

    Yesterday, the Moscow City Court affirmed the trial court’s verdict and sentences in the case against opposition leader Alexei Navalny and his brother Oleg. Alexei Navalny received a suspended sentence of 3.5 years but Oleg Navalny, who is already in jail, was sentenced to a 3.5-year prison term. Alexei Navalny is now technically free from house arrest but there …
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