Posts Tagged ‘Ukraine’

  1. Another road to nowhere

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    April 8, 2016 by AK

    Opponents of the EU-Ukraine association agreement made up 61% of the voters who took part in the Dutch referendum. The turnout was 32%. That works out to 20% of the eligible voters opposing the agreement. Potentially, a powerful minority, but a minority still. Geert Wilders’ logic is enigmatic. To fight radical Islam, destroy the EU. To destroy …
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  2. The conflict is shaping new identities

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    April 15, 2015 by AK

    The Guardian published a long article by Peter Pomerantsev on the Kremlin’s information warfare last week, along with a Russian translation. While it reads smoothly in English, the Russian version requires a little effort to take in, but I still hope it gets reprinted and discussed in Russia. (It has an odd word, блёф, in it, probably a …
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  3. “Worldview factors”

    2

    April 7, 2015 by AK

    Paul Goble has summarized a piece by the Ukrainian journalist Bogdan Butkevich, 10 Reasons Why the Donbass Will Not Become Ulster. I’ve been saying some of these things here and elsewhere but a Ukrainian perspective is more valuable. Some quotes – first, on the recency of settlement: Until the mid-19th century, “this territory was practically empty.” It acquired …
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  4. “More than mere journalism is needed”

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    April 2, 2015 by AK

    More from Peter Pomerantsev’s Ukrains’ka Pravda interview (his text, translated by me, is in blue). I think he cuts to the heart of the problem but I detest the idea of a “global BBC” financed by a group of governments. There are few things government are good at, and the BBC is far from perfect. You are calling …
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  5. “Russia arrived at postmodernism via post-Soviet cynicism”

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    April 1, 2015 by AK

    Peter Pomerantsev speaking to Ukrains’ka Pravda. Excerpt One (dark blue, translation mine), no comment for now: It’s not that the Kremlin has built a political system around Baudrillard’s ideas. Russia arrived at postmodernism via post-Soviet cynicism. It followed its own odd route through to a sense of total relativity of all things, and its route …
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  6. Homecoming/Heimkehr 1941-2015

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    March 18, 2015 by AK

    Last weekend, on the first anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Russian TV aired a propaganda “documentary” called Krym: vozvraschenie na rodinu, which can be translated as Crimea: Homecoming or literally Crimea: The Return to Motherland. Let’s do a simple trick: use bab.la to translate Vozvraschenie na rodinu into German. Here’s the output: Heimkehr. Yuri …
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  7. Born in the country, not far from the ruined capital

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    March 18, 2015 by AK

    Last week, The Interpreter ran a story by Paul Goble that emphasized the importance of the urban-rural divide for understanding today’s Ukraine. The story was largely based on an interview with Sergey Koshman, a coordinator of We Are Europeans, a Ukrainan civil movement, published in Novoye Vremya. Having survived the collectivization and famine of the early 1930s and the …
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  8. There’s a longer run, too (for those who’ll make it)

    1

    March 15, 2015 by AK

    I’m not going to watch that documentary but there seems to be little discrepancy over its content between the state-controlled and independent media and from what I have read so far, I believe this title and subtitle, by the Ukrainian UNIAN, area good summary: Putin admits to personally orchestrating military seizure of Crimea. Russian President Vladimir Putin …
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  9. Don’t make concessions to a cheating player

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    March 10, 2015 by AK

    I have written on the “squeeze Iran, disarm Ukraine” line of geopolitical thinking in this post, and JCass discussed it in the comments to this entry. In three sentences, the logic in question is this: “Putin has nukes, thus must be reckoned with. Let’s admit he has legitimate claims (Ukraine is a pseudo-state anyway) and …
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  10. Six women at the front line

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    March 5, 2015 by AK

    In The Guardian, Elena Savchuk on female nurses and fighters with the Ukrainian volunteer battalion Aidar. My two cents in the comments, edited: The author reports that fighters of the Aidar battalion “have a reputation for fierce nationalism” and writes of Mama Tanya’s “committed nationalism.” But there’s no clarity on the meaning of the term in …
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