Posts Tagged ‘Criminal justice’

  1. ECHR: Navalny and Ofitserov didn’t get a fair trial in 2013

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    February 24, 2016 by AK

    The European Court of Human Rights has unanimously ruled that the 2013 trial of Alexei Navalny and Pyotr Ofitserov was unfair. The principal reason was the prejudicial use of findings from another, fast-track trial – in which they were not represented – against the defendants. I discussed the judicial trap set up for Navalny and Ofitserov – …
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  2. One more judicial smear job?

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    December 9, 2015 by AK

    The latest, largely anticipated, turn in the story: Russian tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky says he has been formally accused in a criminal case that, according to associates, involves the 1998 killing of a Siberian mayor that President Vladimir Putin has previously suggested was ordered by the self-exiled Kremlin critic. Putin freed Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Platon Lebedev early …
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  3. Putin’s jury trial proposal

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    December 4, 2015 by AK

    Putin’s suggestions regarding the criminal justice procedure: He also proposed a change to jury service, saying jurors should judge a wider range of cases but their number be cut to between five and seven from the current 12 at each trial. Because it’s hard to seat a jury of twelve, and expensive, too, according to Putin. The …
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  4. A low-profile political trial in Moscow

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    September 15, 2015 by AK

    Last week in Moscow Alexander Razumov was convicted – by a jury – of trying to recruit Russians into the Ukrainian Right Sector and of inciting ethnonational hatred, and was sentenced to seven years in a labor camp. The man allegedly offered two Russian policemen to join a paramilitary unit under Right Sector’s control in Ukraine and fight …
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  5. Casus Savchenko: women no longer entitled to a jury trial in Russia

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    July 30, 2015 by AK

    Nadiya Savchenko is a Ukrainian military held in a Russian jail, accused of a “war crime” against Russian citizens. She took part in Ukraine’s war against Russia-backed separatists in 2014. It appears that she was kidnapped in Eastern Ukraine and brought to Russia in June 2014. The Russian authorities claim that, while piloting an army …
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  6. “Dangerous speculation that is another example of confirmation bias”

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    March 27, 2015 by AK

    Peter Gill coauthored the 1985 article in Nature that proposed using DNA “fingerprinting” in forensic science. Later on, Dr. Gill developed a “super-sensitive” method of DNA typing known as “low copy number” (LCN) or “low-template” profiling. John M. Butler, the author of the best-known textbook on forensic DNA typing, wrote in 2014: In my opinion. over the past …
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  7. “We fell asleep and I didn’t wake up until Friday morning”

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    March 25, 2015 by AK

    Nina Burleigh writes that Amanda Knox never retracted her bizarre sort-of-confession “officially”: After she was arrested, Knox wrote in a notebook that she wasn’t sure of the memory described in her signed statement, but she did not officially retract her claim that Lumumba had been in the house. Officially or not, Knox passed two handwritten …
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  8. When a judge is more dangerous than a mafioso

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    March 24, 2015 by AK

    Diego Gambetta, a professor of sociology at Oxford and the author of Codes of the Underworld: How Criminals Communicate, explains his findings: An unexpected result of my research on the mafia was to find out that mafiosi are quite incompetent at doing anything… Mafiosi are good at intimidation and stick to it…. They let the professionals and the entrepreneurs …
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  9. Judges and prosecutors “laughing and chatting,” “lunching together”

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    March 22, 2015 by AK

    A brief addendum to this post: in Italy as in Russia, prosecutors and judges often work as one team. I wrote this, among other things, about one of the most shameful criminal trials in recent Russian history (followed by a belated parole): While they were busy with the defendant, the judge would walk out into another …
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  10. What reasonable doubt? Russia learning from Italy

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    March 22, 2015 by AK

    Russia’s infamous Investigative Committee is pushing a bill to make judges in criminal cases search for “objective truth” rather than merely weigh arguments put forward by the prosecution and the defense. To that end, judges would be allowed – and encouraged – to call witnesses and otherwise conduct their own investigation during the trial. Russian …
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