Posts Tagged ‘Russia’

  1. “More than mere journalism is needed”

    4

    April 2, 2015 by AK

    More from Peter Pomerantsev’s Ukrains’ka Pravda interview (his text, translated by me, is in blue). I think he cuts to the heart of the problem but I detest the idea of a “global BBC” financed by a group of governments. There are few things government are good at, and the BBC is far from perfect. You are calling …
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  2. “Russia arrived at postmodernism via post-Soviet cynicism”

    2

    April 1, 2015 by AK

    Peter Pomerantsev speaking to Ukrains’ka Pravda. Excerpt One (dark blue, translation mine), no comment for now: It’s not that the Kremlin has built a political system around Baudrillard’s ideas. Russia arrived at postmodernism via post-Soviet cynicism. It followed its own odd route through to a sense of total relativity of all things, and its route …
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  3. No sane person would fight that wall

    2

    March 24, 2015 by AK

    Paul Goble has translated large excerpts from Semyon F. Gluzman’s interview with Focus, a Kyiv-based journal. Gluzman served seven years in Soviet prisons and labor camps and three years in Siberian exile for his effort to prove that the dissident General Grigorenko had been improperly diagnosed with a mental disorder. I’ve also translated a small bit myself focusing on two …
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  4. Judges and prosecutors “laughing and chatting,” “lunching together”

    2

    March 22, 2015 by AK

    A brief addendum to this post: in Italy as in Russia, prosecutors and judges often work as one team. I wrote this, among other things, about one of the most shameful criminal trials in recent Russian history (followed by a belated parole): While they were busy with the defendant, the judge would walk out into another …
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  5. What reasonable doubt? Russia learning from Italy

    1

    March 22, 2015 by AK

    Russia’s infamous Investigative Committee is pushing a bill to make judges in criminal cases search for “objective truth” rather than merely weigh arguments put forward by the prosecution and the defense. To that end, judges would be allowed – and encouraged – to call witnesses and otherwise conduct their own investigation during the trial. Russian …
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  6. Ecliptica

    0

    March 20, 2015 by AK

    The turnout was strong. Not for an election or an opposition march but for the partial solar eclipse in Moscow. At least in the part of town where I work, people left offices in droves at lunchtime but instead of heading to eateries, occupied nearby vantage points to look at the sun through impromptu screens. …
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  7. 1964–1991–201X

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    March 16, 2015 by AK

    Earlier this year, I finished reading Edward Luttwak’s Coup d’État, the dazzling 1968 “practical handbook” that outlined the soon-to-happen 1974 Portuguese revolution and has been recently invoked to explain the 2013 military coup in Egypt. However, Luttwak took care to distinguish between a coup d’état in a strict sense and various violent means of regime change, such as revolutions, pronunciamientos …
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  8. There’s a longer run, too (for those who’ll make it)

    1

    March 15, 2015 by AK

    I’m not going to watch that documentary but there seems to be little discrepancy over its content between the state-controlled and independent media and from what I have read so far, I believe this title and subtitle, by the Ukrainian UNIAN, area good summary: Putin admits to personally orchestrating military seizure of Crimea. Russian President Vladimir Putin …
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  9. “No longer hyperbolic” to call him one of the most dangerous ideologues

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    March 11, 2015 by AK

    Professor Ronald Beiner of the University of Toronto discusses Alexander Dugin’s dangerousness in a guest post at Crooked Timber. I am reposting my comment, slightly edited. I have always thought of Dugin as a buffoon and charlatan not worth discussing or debating – with the exception of a brief period when I suspected his verbal …
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  10. Five suspects, still no clarity

    3

    March 8, 2015 by AK

    Two more people, all of them ethnic Chechens born and reared in Ingushetia, have been detained as suspects in the Boris Nemtsov murder inquiry. A fifth suspect has reportedly blown himself up with a hand grenade in Grozny. Two of the four men have served with a Chechen special forces unit, reportedly. The other two are …
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